E Hunter Harrison

CSX 3Q18: If Hunter could only see this

Nearly one year after his death at 73, the legendary Hunter Harrison’s quest to improve CSX’s performance through Precision Scheduled Railroading (PSR) appears to be in full swing. CSX’s 3Q18 net earnings of $894 million, or $1.05 per share, vs. $459 million, or $0.51 per share in the same period last year, is a 106% increase. CSX’s operating ratio set a company third-quarter record of 58.7%, compared with 68.4% in the prior year—a 970 basis point improvement.

Book Review: EHH, a lean, mean street fighter

If ever there were a human equivalent to liver and onions—hated or loved, but no in-between—it was the late Ewing Hunter Harrison III, a chief executive of four major North American railroads, personally synonymous with the term “Precision Scheduled Railroading,” and whose mention invokes often disquieting debate on theories of management and how best to deliver shareholder value in the short- and long-term.

Cowen analysis: CSX post-Hunter

The late Hunter Harrison’s body of work “will likely be talked about in railroad circles for decades to come,” says Cowen and Company Managing Director and Railway Age Wall Street Contributing Editor Jason Seidl. “CSX’s Board of Directors will be under significant pressure to find a replacement with an operating background quickly.”

Hunter Seated 2

Hunter aims for a three-peat

COVER STORY, RAILWAY AGE, OCTOBER 2017: After “a very ragged 90 days,” CSX seems to be settling down as its CEO gives his Precision Scheduled Railroading one more go.

CSX’s “very good progress”: Hunter Harrison

Is CSX emerging from what many observers, including customers, say is an operational and service meltdown created by a “too much, too soon” rush to implement Precision Scheduled Railroading on an arguably complex network? CSX President and CEO E. Hunter Harrison says “yes.”

CSX, customers and STB: The letters keep flying

According to numerous observers, CSX service continues to deteriorate, threatening to affect other railroads and, by extension, the economy. Some customers have taken to giving rail traffic to competitor Norfolk Southern. Others, without any other rail options, have moved over to trucks. And some have petitioned the Surface Transportation Board and the House and Senate committees with responsibility for rail transportation to get involved. Letters from all sides have been circulating on Capitol Hill.

What’s going on at CSX?

Hunter Harrison, what exactly is going on at CSX? I’m hearing lots of voices. They’ve become loud and frequent and as such are nearly impossible to ignore. They’re the voices of railroaders, from the executive to the train and engine service level. They’re former and present CSX employees. They’re people who have worked for you at other railroads. And they’re all saying basically the same thing: That the changes you are making at CSX aren’t the right thing to do, or aren’t working.