Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employes Division-International Brotherhood of Teamsters

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WOMEN IN RAIL 2022

RAILWAY AGE, NOVEMBER 2022 ISSUE: Railway Age’s Women in Rail awards program celebrates strong women who excel at leadership, serving the community and contributing to the industry—above and beyond their day-to-day job responsibilities.

BMWED, IBB, SMART-MD Reach Tentative Agreements With NCCC

More than three weeks after Presidential Emergency Board (PEB) No. 250 issued its recommendations on the stalled contract negotiations between 12 rail labor unions and the carriers, the Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees Division (BMWED) of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters; the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers (IBB); and the International Association of Sheet Metal, Air, Rail and Transportation Workers-Mechanical Department (SMART-MD) have reached tentative agreements with the National Carriers’ Conference Committee (NCCC), which represents most major railroads (and many smaller ones) in national collective bargaining.

The House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials called a June 14 hearing to address rail safety. Pictured: Subcommittee Chair Donald M. Payne, Jr. (D-N.J.).

For House Rail Subcommittee, an Earful on Safety

“Examining Freight Rail Safety” was the theme of a June 14 hearing of the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials. The aim: for members “to hear from government and stakeholder witnesses about the state of freight rail safety and issues pertinent to keeping rail operations, rail workers and communities safe.” Railway Age provides a roundup.

NCCC Proposes ‘Advance Payments,’ Unions Say It’s Not Enough (UPDATED, 3 p.m. ET)

The National Carriers’ Conference Committee (NCCC) on April 22 proposed “to enter interim agreements with all rail labor organizations in national handling providing for advance payments of up to $600 per month, representing amounts that are expected to be due under future national collective bargaining agreements.” While most unions had declined as of April 25, NCCC said it would “hold open the proposal” for their further consideration.