Monday, March 26, 2012

Bombardier MITRAC Powerlab opens in Sweden

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Bombardier Transportation said Monday it has opened its second state-of-the-art development and test laboratory, the MITRAC Powerlab, in Västerås, Sweden, which will serve as Bombardier's central competence center for medium power propulsion technology.

The investment demonstrates Bombardier's commitment to Sweden as a location of research and manufacturing excellence with its long history of railway related business, the company said. The cutting-edge technologies developed by Bombardier Transportation in Västerås are in operation around the world, including MITRAC propulsion and controls in metros, regional/commuter, intercity, and high speed trains.

Bombardier opened its the first Powerlab in Zurich, Switzerland, in 2009. Both labs enable Bombardier's engineers to develop and improve its products and to run extensive tests prior to commisioning, shortening the time to market. System tests comprising transformers, traction, auxiliary converters, motors, gearboxes and electronics ensure safe and reliable performance once installed in rail vehicles.

The new development and test laboratory also enables Bombardier to perform additional tests to ensure international standards on noise abatement, electromagnetic compability, and energy efficiency are met, as well as increasing the number of parallel tests, the company said. It is located inside the existing production facilities in Västerås to ensure effective cooperation between engineering and manufacturing departments.

Bombardier Transportation President Propulsion and Controls Per Allmer said, "Our Powerlabs are an important element in ensuring maximum reliability and minimum operational costs for our customers around the world. With the new MITRAC Powerlab, we are also underlining the importance of our competence centre in Västerås. Bombardier's Swedish rail expertise will continue playing a leading role worldwide. Moreover, we remain dedicated to offering innovative transport solutions to the Nordic markets."