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The recession is not currently expected to have a "significant impact" on Bombardier Transportation because "for the rail industry, the fundamentals remain strong."

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Bombardier Inc. issued that statement Wednesday as it reported that its rail equipment division posted earnings before income taxes of $125 million, or $5.6% of revenue totaling $2.3 billion, for the fiscal quarter ended April 30. This compared with EBIT of $118 million, or 4.8% of revenue, for the corresponding period a year ago.

Bombardier Transportation's order backlog at the end of the quarter was $25 billion, compared with $24.7 billion on April 30, 2008. The division reported new orders of $1.2 billion in the quarter, for a book-to-bill ratio of 0.5. Since the end of the quarter, BombardierTransportation has booked orders totaling another $1.2 billion.

Corporate performance was hurt by cancellations of orders for business aircraft at Bombardier Aerospace, which outpaced the level of new orders.

Consolidated revenue reached $4.5 billion in the fiscal quarter, compared with $4.8 billion in he 2008 period EBIT was $235 million, down from $312 million.

As for the future, President and CEO Pierre Beaudoin commented: "We are taking action to cope with the present economic situation as we continue to invest in new products such as the C Series, the Learjet 85,the ZEFIRO high speed trains, and the EC4 suite of technologies, At $47.4 billion, our large and well diversified backlog, combined with our strong balance sheet, high level of liquidity, and the cost cutting measures already in place, will enable us to weather the storm."

--> The recession is not currently expected to have a "significant impact" on Bombardier Transportation because "for the rail industry, the fundamentals remain strong." ...

New York State’s legislature recently passed legislation closing a two-year, $5 billion operating budget gap, but according to a report released Tuesday by New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, longer-term financing support remains problematic.

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The report says budget gaps in calendar years 2009 and 2010 are relatively small, though budget risks could make balancing the budget more difficult. Moreover, budget woes in successive years could once again become severe, DiNapoli said.

“An unprecedented increase in state assistance will stabilize the MTA’s operating budget and could help fund the next capital program, but the MTA is not fully out of the woods yet,” DiNapoli said. “The MTA has to deliver on its promise to reduce costs. I’m also concerned that the next five-year capital plan may rely too heavily on debt, which would divert resources from operating needs, just as heavy borrowing in the past has contributed to the MTA’s current fiscal crisis.”

The comptroller announced three new audits of the MTA in addition to two MTA audits already under way, continuing his review of the MTA’s financial operations. The audits include: examining the authority’s cashmanagement controls and its banking services and fees; reviewing the efficiency of the MTA’s maintenance program; and examining the costs and timeliness of the MTA’s capital program.

--> New York State’s legislature recently passed legislation closing a two-year, $5 billion operating budget gap, but according to a report released Tuesday by New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli, longer-term financing support remains problematic. ...

The Ramsey County (Minn.) Board Tuesday unanimously approved purchasing St. Paul’s Union Depot main building for $8.2 million, to facilitate use by the planned 11-mile, $914 million Central Corridor light rail transit project and for future passenger intermodal options as well. The board serves as the Regional Rail Authority oversestpauluniondepot-2.jpgeing the matter.

The purchase includes the head house and the parking structure and the land that the building sits on. Thirty-nine condo units built by the current owner will remain in private hands.

Union Depot is scheduled to reopen in 2012, two years ahead of the planned debut of the Central Corridor. The depot was built from 1918 to 1923. 

"Today marks the official start of the project to return the Union Depot to what it once was: a transportation hub for Ramsey County, the state of Minnesota, and the entire upper Midwest," Commissioner Jim McDonough, chair of the Regional Rail Authorityst.-paul-1.jpg, said. The site would facilitate Amtrak and/or Midwest high speed rail service, Greyhouse and Jefferson Lines buses, Metro Transit, and bicycle transit options under current plans.

 


--> The Ramsey County (Minn.) Board Tuesday unanimously approved purchasing St. Paul’s Union Depot main building for $8.2 million, to facilitate use by the planned 11-mile, $914 million Central Corridor light rail transit project and for future passenger ...

State officials and rail advocates in Iowa and Illinois have been lobbying for new Amtrak routes to add to the national rail passenger carrier’s Chicago hub. Now a similar effort in the Midwest, spearheaded by Appleton, Wis., representatives, seeks to restore passenger rail service to the state’s Fox Valley, connecting Green Bay, Wis., with Chicago.

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"We could transport people from here and get them connected to Chicago, one of the biggest economic engines in the country and the world. That's an incredibly powerful thing to have," said PaulLinzmeyer, president of the advocacy group NEWRails and a founder of New North, an economic development consortium of 18 northeastern Wisconsin counties.

Fox Valley last was served by passenger service Apr. 30, 1971; Amtrak’s launch the next day terminated all offerings to the region. Advocates say Amtrak could run on existing Canadian National right-of-way,stopping at Appleton, Neenah, Menasha, Oshkosh, and Fond du Lac, terminating or originating in Green Bay.

--> State officials and rail advocates in Iowa and Illinois have been lobbying for new Amtrak routes to add to the national rail passenger carrier’s Chicago hub. Now a similar effort in the Midwest, spearheaded by Appleton, Wis., representatives, seeks to r ...

Perhaps stating what many in the passenger railroad business would consider obvious, Canada’s Department of Finance has labeled VIA Rail as "not self-sustaining," grouping VIA Rail with eight other entities that could be sold as part of the government's asset review.

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Ottawa last November said it would conduct a review of Crown assets, and government documents publicized since then suggest the government would consider privatizing VIA Rail and at least eight corporations requiring federal financial assistance. The move is part of a government effort to rein in Canada’s deficit, expected to surpass C$50 billion (US$46 billion) this year. Asset sales are projected to raise as much as C$4 billion (US$3.7 billion).

Under the Financial Administration Act, Parliament would have to approve the privatization of any Crown corporation, and such passage is not assured, observers said.

A Finance Department spokeswoman said the asset review won't necessarily lead to sales in all cases.

--> Perhaps stating what many in the passenger railroad business would consider obvious, Canada’s Department of Finance has labeled VIA Rail as "not self-sustaining," grouping VIA Rail with eight other entities that could be sold ...
Elliot G. Sander, recently forced out by New York Gov. David Paterson as chief executive of the New York Metropolitan Transportation Authority, offered his opinion to The New York Times in a strongly worded editorial published June 1. In it, Sander (pictured below), a seasoned and hi ...

Amid fallen giant General Motors Corp.’s larger troubles,the beleaguered U.S. auto manufacturer owes CSX Corp. $8.9 million for automotive shipments. CSX hopes to receive some reimbursement despite GM’s declaration of bankruptcy June 1.

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"We've had informal discussions about that they would assume our contract and wouldn't be able to get out of bankruptcy until they made good," CSX spokesman Garrick Francis said. Francis said CSX has carrier liens on all the goods that are in transit so it won't lose money on those carloads.

CSX’s involvement and exposure is relatively small, given that Detroit-based GM owes creditors roughly $172 billion.  

--> Amid fallen giant General Motors Corp.’s larger troubles,the beleaguered U.S. auto manufacturer owes CSX Corp. $8.9 million for automotive shipments. CSX hopes to receive some reimbursement despite GM’s declaration of bankruptcy June 1. ...

RailComm says its wireless remote control derail system at Hammond, Ind.-based Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad’s RIP track facility is fully functional. A customized Local Control Panel, located within the shop, provides wireless remote control to the derails. The panel includes a keypad for advanced security and logging.

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The user is required to input a unique passcode (PIN #) to operate the derail machines. All control panel operations are recorded and stored on a wirelessly linked PC workstation.

The data entries contain the name  and trade of the operator, the nature of the operation, and the date and time. Fairport, N.Y.-based RailComm says the workstation allows supervisors, managers, and other authorized personnel to review the operation logs and manage the system security. 

--> RailComm says its wireless remote control derail system at Hammond, Ind.-based Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad’s RIP track facility is fully functional. A customized Local Control Panel, located within the shop, provides wireless remote control to the dera ...

Sen. Herb Kohl (D-Wis.), prime sponsor of Senate bill S. 146, the Railroad Antitrust Enforcement Act of 2009, said Monday he was canceling a Senate vote on the bill, originally scheduled for June 2. S. 146 seeks to remove the rail industry’s limited antitrust exemptions, and also would remove the Surface Transportation Board’s exclusive jurisdiction over the rail industry.

Kohl said he has reached agreement with others, including Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.), chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, to possibly include some limited portions of S. 146 into a bill that the Senate Commerce Committee plans to introduce in the near future that would reauthorize the STB.

In a “Dear Colleague” letter Monday signed by both Kohl and Rockefeller, the senators said “we have jointly decided to ask Senator [Harry] Reid (D-Nev.) to withdraw the pending cloture petition on S. 146, the Railroad Antitrust Enforcement Act. We share the common goals of addressing the longstanding concerns of rail shippers and making the rail industry more competitive.

“The Commerce and Judiciary Committees intend to work together on comprehensive rail competition legislation,” the letter continued. “We hope to shortly have a bipartisan package that reforms the Surface Transportation Board and repeals the railroads’ antitrust exemption available for the consideration by the full Senate. We are working on harmonizing our two efforts to produce a robust reform package.”  

Late last week, Rockefeller and three other Commerce Committee members—Sens. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Tex.), Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.), and John Thune (R-S.D.)—circulated a letter asking other senators to oppose a procedural motion that must pass before the Senate can take a final vote on the bill’s passage. The move was backed by the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen.

--> Sen. Herb Kohl (D-Wis.), prime sponsor of Senate bill S. 146, the Railroad Antitrust Enforcement Act of 2009, said Monday he was canceling a Senate vote on the bill, originally scheduled for June 2. S. 146 seeks to remove the rail indust ...

Railroad stocks handily outperformed the Dow Jones Industrial average in a Wall Street rally that followed the release of unexpectedly strong economic indicators. Reuters said the new data "bolstered optimism that the worst of the global recession was past."

In early afternoon trading, the Dow was up 2.55%, with railroads showing the following gains: CSX, 7.02%; Union Pacific, 6.60%. Norfolk Southern, 6.53%; Burlington Northern Santa Fe, 5.95%; Canadian Pacific, 4.23%; Kansas City Southern, 3.2%; and Canadian National, 2.72%.

One welcome sign was the Commerce Department's report on Monday that U.S. construction posed an unexpected 0.9% gain in Ariel--the second month in a row that builders around the country increased spending. Economists had expected a 1.2% drop in April.

More good news came from the Institute for Supply Management, which said its May index of manufacturing was 42.8, its highest level since last September. Thomson Reuters analysts had anticipated a May index of 42.

Meanwhile, railroad traffic, while still registering double-digit losses, appears to have slowed its rate of decrease. U.S. carload traffic for the week ended May 23 was 21.5% below the corresponding week in 2008, but 4.9% ahead of the previous week.

--> Railroad stocks handily outperformed the Dow Jones Industrial average in a Wall Street rally that followed the release of unexpectedly strong economic indicators. Reuters said the new data "bolstered optimism that the worst of the global recess ...
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