Latest News Continued

Toronto-based GO Transit will commence summer weekend and holiday rail service to Ontario’s Niagara Region beginning June 27. The service will offer four train trips daily in each direction on Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays from June 27 through through Canadian Thanksgiving weekend, October 12.

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The two-hour trip will  link Toronto’s Union Station with Port Credit GO Station, Oakville GO Station, Burlington GO Station, St. Catharines VIA Rail Station, and Niagara Falls VIA Rail Station.

An adult single ride fare from Union Station to Niagara Falls will be C$15.90.

"This new GO rail service will bring tourists to Niagara's wineries, restaurants, and attractions such as the incomparable Niagara Falls. Our government is expanding public transit across the province, making investments
that build our economic infrastructure and put people to work," said Ontario Minister of Transportation Jim Bradley in a statement.

--> Toronto-based GO Transit will commence summer weekend and holiday rail service to Ontario’s Niagara Region beginning June 27. The service will offer four train trips daily in each direction on Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays from June 27 through throug ...

The Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority (WMATA) is expected Thursday to approve a $4 million environmental and engineering study of the Columbia Pike Streetcar, a five-mile line extending from Washington Metro’s Pentagon City Station in Arlington, Va.

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The streetcar plan, backed by Virginia’s Arlington and Fairfax counties, will overlap and supplement existing bus routes currently handling about 14,000 passengers per day. The streetcar is projected to cost at least $160 million, up from an estimate of $150 million in 2008; it would include 12 stops, according to the Columbia Pike Revitalization Organization, a non-profit public/private partnership pursuing the project under its Pike Transit Initiative subsidiary.

“We’re quite enthusiastic about it in Arlington,” said Christopher Zimmerman, an Arlington County supervisor who sits on WMATA’s board of directors. “For us, it’s one of our top transportation priorities in Arlington. It’s critical to the development planned in the corridor.”

--> The Washington Metropolitan Transit Authority (WMATA) is expected Thursday to approve a $4 million environmental and engineering study of the Columbia Pike Streetcar, a five-mile line extending from Washington Metro’s Pentagon City Station in Arlington, ...

MTA Maryland has received a State Employee Risk Management Administration (SERMA) Award of Excellence in the Health & Safety Working Groups category for implementing an advanced warning system. MTA implemented the system on Feb. 8, following two years of testing, tapping ProTran 1 LLC’s Protracker wireless advance warning system.

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MTA says the technology warns train operators of dangers ahead such as track workers, emergency responders, and speed restriction locations. The technology also alerts track workers and emergency responders of approaching trains. The technology is also capable of giving advance warning to the train operator of fire and chemical releases.

The agency claims to be the first transit property in North America to have a fully operational wireless advanced warning system, and says other U.S. transit properties are using MTA’s approach as a model.

--> MTA Maryland has received a State Employee Risk Management Administration (SERMA) Award of Excellence in the Health & Safety Working Groups category for implementing an advanced warning system. MTA implemented the system on Feb. 8, following two years of ...

U.S. senators from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York are vocally backing a 20-year effort to restore passenger rail service along the Lackawanna Cut-Off, a famed rail right-of-way that last saw active rail service in 1981. The Cut-Off this week received a “finding of no significant impact,” or FONSI, from the Environmental Protection Agency, clearing the way for the states to seek funding.

Recent media attention has focused on support from Pennsylvania’s two senators, Arlen Specter and Bob Casey (both Democrats), but any service introduction likely will begin in New Jersey, with New Jersey Transit extending its existing operations west of Port Morris, N.J.  New Jersey’s U.S. Senate contingent ,Robert Menendez and Frank R. Lautenberg (also both Democrats), have supported the line’s resumption for many years.

A relative newcomer is U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.), who has voiced support for efforts to extend the Cut-Off project north of Scranton, Pa., across the state border to Binghamtom, N.Y, in New York State’s Southern Tier region.

For New Jersey, one factor driving the project is the potential loss of federal highway funds if the state fails to improve air quality under the Clean Air Act. Service on the Cut-Off route would offer a travel alternative to citizens in northwest New Jersey and northeastPennsylvania who now use Interstate 80 as the primary travel option.

Most involved with the project at present presume that NewJersey Transit would be the initial operator of any service, though some have argued that the tristate nature of the larger plan requires Amtrak to play an eventual role.

Lawrence Malski, chairman of the Northeast Pennsylvania Regional Railroad Authority, said the project will be completed in phases to allow for lower funding requests. Though Malski and others suggest that the initial Pennsylvania service from Delaware Water Gap could be up and running in four years, many industry observers, citing the 20 years already logged by project proponents, say such a timetable is optimistic at best.

--> U.S. senators from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York are vocally backing a 20-year effort to restore passenger rail service along the Lackawanna Cut-Off, a famed rail right-of-way that last saw active rail service in 1981. The Cut-Off this week received ...

Theresa Watkins McMillan, deputy executive director of policy for the San Francisco Bay Area Metropolitan Transportation Commission, has been named deputy administrator of the Federal Transit Administration

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In announcing the appointment on June 5, FTA noted that McMillan will join administrator Peter Rogoff "in leading a staff of more than 500 in Washington, D. C., and 10 regional offices across the United States and managing an annual budget of approximately $10 billion and $8.4 billion in Recovery Act funds."

"Ms. McMillan brings real world expedience and a history of achievement to FTA," said Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood. "She will be a valuable asset to the federal transportation program and the Department's senior management team."

--> Theresa Watkins McMillan, deputy executive director of policy for the San Francisco Bay Area Metropolitan Transportation Commission, has been named deputy administrator of the Federal Transit Administration ...

At a ceremony Monday in North Bergen, N.J., marking the ceremonial start of construction for a new trans-Hudson rail tunnel, Federal Transit Administrator Peter Rogoff pledged $3 billion in federal funding to fully cover the cost ofthe $8.7 billion project, called Access to the Region’s Core Mass Transit Tunnel.

Rogoff said the FTA would offer a "down payment”  toward an eventual commitment of $3 billion by approving a $1.35 billion Early Systems Work Agreement to immediately commence work on the tunnel project. The Agreement includes $650 million in federal funds, including funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, to be matched by an equal amount of local funding.

“This project has been talked about for decades. Because of New Jersey’s leadership and President Obama’s recovery agenda, today the talk stops and the construction begins,” Rogoff said. “The Obama Administration is committed to being a full partner in this historic investment. It will put thousands of people to work. It will improve the lives of many thousands more by shortening their commute.”  

The tunnel will allow New Jersey Transit trains access to a new station in midtown Manhattan, north and east of existing Penn Station. Monday’s ceremony marked construction of a bridge to span U.S. Routes 1 and 9 over the new tunnel’s mouth on the New Jersey side.

The project is targeted for completion in 2016, and is paired with a second $1.7 billion project to replace the Northeast Corridor’s Portal Bridge, which spans the Hackensack River in the New Jersey Meadowlands.

--> At a ceremony Monday in North Bergen, N.J., marking the ceremonial start of construction for a new trans-Hudson rail tunnel, Federal Transit Administrator Peter Rogoff pledged $3 billion in federal funding to fully cover the cost ofthe $8.7 ...

Like all railroads, CSX Transportation is hurting from the deep business slump that saw industry-wide carload traffic drop by 25% in May. But like most railroads, CSX is sticking with a strong capital investment program this year in anticipation of post-recession traffic growth.

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In a speech to Cornerstone, the regional economic partnership of Northeast Florida, on June 5, CSX Chairman and CEO Michael Ward renewed his pledge that the railroad will spend about $1.6 billion on capital improvements in 2009, just a little lower than last year's $1.7 billion. It's part of a three-year, $5 billion spending program.

As Ward put it to the Cornerstone group, "We were really doing stimulus before stimulus was cool."

The latest economic forecast calls for a 90% increase in railroad traffic over the next 15 years, due not only to a rise in normal demand but also to an acceleration in the shift of long-distance traffic from trucks to rails.

 

 

 

--> Like all railroads, CSX Transportation is hurting from the deep business slump that saw industry-wide carload traffic drop by 25% in May. But like most railroads, CSX is sticking with a strong capital investment program this year in anticipatio ...

VIA Rail President and CEO Paul Cote says the passenger railroad is prepared for any role in high speed rail pursued by the Canadian government. While waiting, VIA will continue improving its existing system, tapping new capital investment of C$900 million (about US$800 million) since 2007.

"The current investment of $900 million that the government has allowed us to do will help to continue to build that foundation, because that is the key, when the high speed systems comes into play, if the government goes ahead," said Cote, testified last week before Parliament on high speed rail matters. "The ridership of the franchise needs to be built to achieve that."

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Cote told the House of Commons Transport Committee that VIA Rail ridership has increased 33%, and revenue has risen 110%, since 1990 as infrastructure and service improvements have been put in place. "I can assure you that the people at VIA Rail have the competence, the expertise and the motivation (to become a partner in a high speed rail project)," said Cote. "If we are allowed to do this and if the context permits, VIA Rail will be able to show its expertise, quality, and experience developed over all the years."

Cote also said VIA was encouraged by U.S. plans for high speed rail improvements, some of which include rail route directly or indirectly linking with Canadian locales, including Montreal, Vancouver, and Windsor. But Cote said any Canadian HSR approach would be incremental by design. The provincial governments in Quebec and Ontario, along with the federal government, are weighing plans forhigh speed rail linking Quebec City and Windsor that would take a decade tobuild and cost C$18 billion (US$16 billion).

A private consortium of firms, assisted by those governments, is expected  to make recommendations in 2010.

"I know that there is some impatience that some people would like it to be faster," Cote said. "But that's the way the governments decided to go. So we will offer our assistance to make it happen and at the end we will have a very well documented story line for high speed rail."

For now, VIA Rail will continue to use trains that travel up to 160 km/h (100mph) on the Quebec City-Windsor corridor, along rights-of-way shared with freight operations.  --> VIA Rail President and CEO Paul Cote says the passenger railroad is prepared for any role in high speed rail pursued by the Canadian government. While waiting, VIA will continue improving its existing system, tapping new capital investment of C$900 million (a ...

Beginning June 8 for a three-week test period, MTA New York City Transit will operate a “Bronx Express 4” train service southbound, skipping nine stations in the Bronx, in an effort to provide faster service for weekday morning riders bound for Manhattan.

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The move leverages New York’s City’s ability, unparalleled by other U.S. urban transit operations, to provide express and local rapid rail services. The new express train will be aided by upgraded signaling, and an upgraded third track along its route in the Bronx.

Officials hope to cut trip time by 3.5 minutes, modest by some measures but “a significant time saving when you are headed out to work in the morning," IRT East Group General Manager David Knight said.

The weekday pilot program will run through June 26, with an express train departing from the No. 4 line’s terminus in Woodlawn every 15 minutes between 7:15 a.m. and 8 a.m. on weekdays. Express services will stop at Moshulu Parkway, Burnside Ave., and 149th Street, then proceed south into Manhattan on its usual express run. Conductors will alert riders that the trains are running express, NYC Transit President Howard Roberts said.

--> Beginning June 8 for a three-week test period, MTA New York City Transit will operate a “Bronx Express 4” train service southbound, skipping nine stations in the Bronx, in an effort to provide faster service for weekday morning riders bound for ...

Call it the dreary month of May. The Association of American Railroads reported Thursday that U.S. carloadings sank 24.7% last month, compared with the same month last year. Intermodal traffic fared only a little better, posting a 19.7% loss.

Canadian railroads saw carload traffic drop 32.8%, and intermodal traffic declined 18%.

"May marked the second straight month in which U. S. rail carloads had double-digit declines, a consequence of lower electricity demand and higher coal stockpiles," said AAR Senior Vice President John T. Gray. "Industrial production is still down sharply across the board. That means lower demand for rail service for everything from chemicals and scrap metals to cement and ores. Basically, railroads are in a waiting game—waiting for the economy to turn."

For just the last week of May, carload traffic in the U.S. was down 26.3%, and intermodal volume was down 19.2%. In Canada for the week ended May 30, carloadings were down 30.9% and intermodal declined 20.8%.

 

 

--> Call it the dreary month of May. The Association of American Railroads reported Thursday that U.S. carloadings sank 24.7% last month, compared with the same month last year. Intermodal traffic fared only a little better, posting a 19.7% loss. ...
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