Latest News Continued

Calgary, the province of Alberta, and the Canadian federal government have agreed to supply C$270 million (US$235 million) to advance nine transit projects, including creating four-car light rail platforms and add a station on Calgary’s new west leg of its LRT system. Each of the three players will contribute C$90 million during the next two years.

Besides station platforms, other items to be funded include installation of electronic fare collection, transit signal priority projects, closed circuit television security, an advanced passenger information system, and LRT traction power upgrades. Improvements to existing Bus Rapid Transit park-and-ride lots also are in the plan.

Calgary’s west LRT station construction is expected to start in 2010. The city was the second North American municipality to launch modern LRT service, debuting May 25, 1981, following the three-year lead of Edmonton, Alberta, and beating San Diego’s launch of LRT service by two months. Today Calary Transit’s 28-mile C-Train system averages 297,500 rides per weekday, the second-highest in North America behind only Monterrey, Mexico.

 

--> Calgary, the province of Alberta, and the Canadian federal government have agreed to supply C$270 million (US$235 million) to advance nine transit projects, including creating four-car light rail platforms and add a station on Calgary’s new west leg of ...

For the 20th year in a row, Norfolk Southern has won the 2008 E.H. Harriman Gold Award for Group A, recognized for the best employee safety record among line-haul railroads whose employees worked 15 million employee-hours or more each year. CSX Transportation won the silver, and Union Pacific the bronze, within Group A.

ns_logo.jpg

Within Group B, comprised of line-haul railroads whose employees worked four-to-15 million employee-hours annually, the gold went to Kansas City Southern Railway, KCS’s third year in a row. Canadian Pacific’s U.S. operations was awarded the silver, and Chicago-based Metra the bronze, within Group B.

Among Group C participants, railroads whose employees worked less than four million employee-hours during the award period, the gold award went to the Willamette & Pacific Railroad, while Florida East Coast Railway took the silver and the Wheeling and Lake Erie the bronze.

In Group S&T, for switching and terminal companies, the Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis took the award for gold for the second consecutive year. The silver award went to the Birmingham Southern Railroad; Consolidated Rail Corp. (Conrail) received the bronze award.

Certificates of Commendation also were awarded to four railroads with continuous gains in employee safety improvements over a three-year period and showing the most improvement between 2007 and 2008. Those railroads include CSX Transportation (Group A), Metro-North Railroad (Group B), Wheeling & Lake Erie Railway (Group C), and the Belt Railway of Chicago (S&T).

The Harriman Awards were established in 1913 by Mary W. Harriman in memory of her husband, Edward H. Harriman.

In Washington Wednesday, Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood praised the freight rail industry’s emphasis on safety. “Our nation's railroads and their employees can be proud of their safety record,” LaHood said.  "Our freight rail industry is the envy of the world, as the cleanest, safest, most efficient way to keep America's freight moving."

Edward R. Hamberger, president and CEO of the Association of American Railroads (AAR), stressed that the industry’s safety performance was no fluke.  "Railroads are the safest form of freight transportation today and such attention to safety has produced an enviable track record,” he said, adding, "I am delighted to report that this continuous emphasis on safety paid dividends last year in producing both the lowest train accident rate in history and the lowest employee injury rate in history."

On the individual level, BNSF Machinist Robert F. “Bob” Johnson was recognized as the 2008 winner of the Harold F. Hammond Award for railroad safety, honoring the employee who has demonstrated outstanding safety achievement during the preceding year.

Johnson, a machinist with BNSF for 36 years, has participated in and developed numerous projects and innovations, including bi-directional blue flags for worker protection, a universal fit locomotive stairwell platform, a structurally engineered traction motor storage rack, and a locomotive cab window removal tool and process.

Johnson is active in numerous railroad related community safety initiatives.  He volunteers for Operation Lifesaver, the nationwide, non-profit public information program dedicated to reducing collisions, injuries and fatalities at highway-rail crossings and in and on railroad rights-of-way.

Seven other industry employees were honored with Certificates of Commendation for their work in enhancing safety.  They include: David Cowan, a superintendent with Amtrak in Los Angeles; Gary Deval, a conductor with CN in Baton Rouge, La.; Trevor Shatek, a signal maintainer with Canadian Pacific in St. Paul, Minn.; Larry Davis, an electrician with CSX in Cumberland, Md.; Ronnie Benefield, a carman with Kansas City Southern in Monroe, Okla.; JerryBean, an engineer with Norfolk Southern in Decatur, Ill.; and Israel Maldonado, a carman with Union Pacific in Stockton, Calif.

--> For the 20th year in a row, Norfolk Southern has won the 2008 E.H. Harriman Gold Award for Group A, recognized for the best employee safety record among line-haul railroads whose employees worked 15 million employee-hours or more each year.  ...

Union Pacific announced that it hauled its 200,000th coal train out of the Southern Powder River Basin on Tuesday, a benchmark that UP said "proves the capital investment in our coal corridor continues to pay dividends for our customers."

up_logo.jpg

UP's announcement coincided with the railroad's testimony at a congressional hearing on re-regulation legislation that UP says could "significantly" reduce its capital spending.

"One rail car of coal provides the energy to generate enough electricity for more than 20 homes for a year," noted the railroad. “Union Pacific's 200,000 trains out of the SPRB have carried enough coal to power all the homes in the United States for five years. Approximately 50% of America's electricity comes from coal, one of the most affordable and reliable energy sources."

Some of the railroad industry's utility coal customers are among those "captive shippers" who have been supporting a bill in Congress that would removes the industry's few remaining antitrust exemptions, which the Association of American Railroads says could be the backdoor to re-regulation on a broad scale.

--> Union Pacific announced that it hauled its 200,000th coal train out of the Southern Powder River Basin on Tuesday, a benchmark that UP said "proves the capital investment in our coal corridor continues to pay dividends for our customers. ...

After being buffeted for years by fiscal concerns and by diverse opinion and critique enveloping the overall rebuilding of New York’s World Trade Center site, the site’s Transportation Hub final design has been unveiled by architect Santiago Calatrava. A model of the design will be on display through Aug. 31 at the Queen Sofia Spanish Institute in New York, as part of an exhibition entitled, "Santiago Calatrava: World Trade Center Transportation Hub."

The Transportation Hub will serve the Port Authority’s PATH bistate rapid transit line, and serve as an access point for numerous subway lines operated by MTA New York City Transit.

wtc_hub_calatrava.jpg

The final design has emerged from a torturous political process launched in late 2003, as the Port Authority of New York & New Jersey selected Downtown Design Partnership, a joint venture of DMJM + Harris, STV Group Inc., and Parsons Transportation in association with Santiago Calatrava S.A. to design the facility, as part of the larger effort in lower Manhattan to rebuild on (and under) Ground Zero.

Calatrava’s glass and steel structure allows natural light to flood the Transportation Hub during the day; at night the illuminated building will serve as a lantern for the plaza and the (still undetermined number of) office towers surrounding it. The roof of the Hub's freestanding structure will be fitted with an operable skylight located along the central axis. During good weather, and on September 11th each year, the skylight will open, providing the interior space with a slice of sky and its natural light.

In a statement, Calatrava said, “In its revised state the project retains all of its fundamental beauty and functionality.” He added, "It is my hope that the Transportation Hub will serve generations of commuters, subway riders, pedestrians, and local residents well into the years to come."

--> After being buffeted for years by fiscal concerns and by diverse opinion and critique enveloping the overall rebuilding of New York’s World Trade Center site, the site’s Transportation Hub final design has been unveiled by architect Santiago Calat ...

Flouting traditional routes taken by most state departments of transportation, Maryland transportation officials are emphasizing financing the proposed 16-mile Purple Line light rail project, traversing the northern Maryland suburbs of Washington, D.C., while demoting two “major” road projects in Montgomery and Prince George’s counties.

--> Flouting traditional routes taken by most state departments of transportation, Maryland transportation officials are emphasizing financing the proposed 16-mile Purple Line light rail project, traversing the northern Maryland suburbs of Washington, D.C., whi ...
Add Safetran Systems, a division of Invensys Rail Group, to the stable of major railway industry suppliers offering Positive Train Control technology. ...
Norfolk Southern’s second chairman, Arnold B. McKinnon, died May 18 in Washington D.C. A resident of Norfolk, Va., he was 81. McKinnon “leaves a 50-year legacy of railroad leadership that will not be duplicated or forgotten,” NS said in an announcement.   ...

Choosing the Railway Systems Suppliers, Inc. 2009 Exposition in Nashville, Tenn., as its announcement stage, GE Transportation on Tuesday said it has launched the Connection line of Positive Train Control-compliant products for rail networks operating in the United States.

ge_transport.jpg

The Erie, Pa.-based subsidiary of Fairfield, Conn.-based General Electric Co. said the PTC-compliant line was in response to passage last October of the Rail Safety Improvement Act, which mandates PTC for most major rail routes throughout the U.S., and for all rail routes handling a mix of freight and passenger rail traffic.

GE said the Connection line addresses four issues railroads must prevent with a PTC system: train-to-train collisions; “over speed” derailments; incursions into established work zone limits; and movement of a train through a switch left in the improper position.

rssi_logo.jpg_color.jpg

In a statement, GE Transportation said, “This means upgrades for approximately 100,000 miles of track, close to 90% of the total rail network, and 17,000 locomotives to make North American railroads PTC ready.  Today, there are more than 100,000 wayside signal devices alone on rail lines throughout the U.S. and Canada. In some cases, larger railroads will need to add PTC functionality to several wayside locations per day, every day, just to meet the mandate within the specified timeframe.”

On Monday, GE Transportation unveiled its Evolution® Series locomotive Model ES44C4

 

 

--> Choosing the Railway Systems Suppliers, Inc. 2009 Exposition in Nashville, Tenn., as its announcement stage, GE Transportation on Tuesday said it has launched the Connection line of Positive Train Control-compliant products for rail networks operating in the ...
In testimony before the House Judiciary Committee, Courts and Competition Subcommittee, Association of American Railroads President and CEO Edward Hamberger warned that H.R. 233, the Railroad Antitrust Enforcement Act of 2009, “would damage the public interest and severely distort the relation ...

House Resolution [H.R.} 233, the Railroad Antitrust Enforcement Act of 2009, currently being considered by Congress, would damage the public interest and severely distort the relationship between regulation and antitrust laws, the Association of American Railroads said Tuesday.

--> House Resolution [H.R.} 233, the Railroad Antitrust Enforcement Act of 2009, currently being considered by Congress, would damage the public interest and severely distort the relationship between regulation and antitrust laws, the Association of American Ra ...
527
Page 527 of 561