Monday, September 27, 2010

From the Editor: After more than 100 years, New York still digs (July 2010)

Written by 
william-vantuono-web.jpg

By William C. Vantuono, Editor

 

Creation of two new subway extensions in New York City is testimony to the drive and persistence that eventually gets very bigthings done in a very big city.

New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg stubbornly wanteda $2.1 billion West Side subway extension (the No. 7 Flushing Line) to helpcommercial development, and he's getting it. The city is funding it for the NewYork Metropolitan Transportation Authority, a state agency, and the tunneling machinehas been digging away.

On the other side of town, another tunnelingmachine is (at last!) grinding its way along the path of the first phase of the$4.8 billion Second Avenue Subway, long the dream of planners-and the nightmareof guardians of the public purse.

That such visionary public projects can prosper inthe budget squeeze that has strangled so many other worthy projects is eloquentevidence of the priority that public transportation is getting these days. Acity like New York, which Doug Bowen points out expects to add 1.5 millionpeople in the near future, really has no choice.

These two expansions are just the "top of the news"on the transit scene in New York. Under a revised five-year capital improvementprogram-slightly shrunk from the previous one, but still impressive-MTA NewYork City Transit will continue purchasing new subway cars. The most recentorder, for $87 million, went to Kawasaki Railcar USA for 23 new R-188s. Withall options exercised, NYCT will take delivery during the next few years on 123R-188s and refurbish 350 cars-$384 million worth of work. A $343 millioncommunications-based train control system from Thales (details, p. 8) is slatedfor the entire No. 7 line, including an update of the traditional technology onthe existing No. 7 route. Meanwhile, as noted in our recent Passenger RailPlanner's Guide (March issue), the $527 million reconfigured South FerryStation opened on March 16, expanding capacity and improving transfers to theStaten Island Ferry and other NYCT subways. Earlier, NYCT exercised optionswith Alstom Transport and Kawasaki for 382 R-160 cars on a contract originallyawarded in 2002. There are now more than 1,400 R-160s service, out of NYCT'sfleet of nearly 6,300 cars.

That's what I call rolling out the rolling stock!No wonder the transit car components business for companies like Wabtec, whichsupplies both the freight and passenger rail industries, is doing so well. Insome cases, were it not for rail transit, these suppliers would be struggling.Remember, we won't see an appreciable improvement in the freight car marketuntil 2012.

New York'sRenaissance Man: Legendary civil engineer William Barclay Parsons(1859-1932) designed the Interborough Rapid Transit, New York's first subway,and many other engineering marvels, among them the Cape Cod Canal. ParsonsBrinckerhoff, the engineering firm he founded in 1885 with his brother, Harryde Berkeley Parsons, is celebrating its 125th anniversary.

"William Barclay Parsons: A Renaissance Man of OldNew York" celebrates the life and accomplishments of this remarkable man.Written by PB Manager of Editorial Services Tom Malcolm, a senior member of thecompany's Corporate Communications Group, the book describes an individualwhose achievements were surpassed only by his modesty.

On the IRT's opening day, Oct. 27, 1904, ChiefEngineer Parsons gave the shortest speech amidst all the pomp and circumstance.He simply said, "I have the honor and very great pleasure to state that theRapid Transit Railroad from the City Hall Station to the station of 145thStreet, on the west side line, is ready and complete for operation."

Indeed, what more be said?

The next day, a reporter for The World newspaperasked Parsons, "Does it give you any emotion to have finished the first stageof your work-not to have it with you?" Parsons replied, in his usualunderstated manner: "I had a feeling this morning of pleasure-when I went intothe station to come downtown and saw the people rushing for the trains-it didgive a great feeling of pleasure, quite a little  emotion, the thought that I had been instrumental inbringing it to pass. I really felt that I had done something for somebody; thatI had helped people along a little bit. I stood there and watched them forquite a while, and it pleased me-yes, it made me happy."

The company that William Barclay Parsons founded all thoseyears ago today employs 14,000 people in 150 offices on six continents, doingthings ranging from strategic consulting to program and constructionmanagement. I think that would have made him happy. 

william-c.-vantuono-signatu.jpg

 

William Vantuono

With Railway Age since 1992, Bill Vantuono has broadened and deepened the magazine's coverage of the technological revolution that is so swiftly changing the industry. He has also strengthened Railway Age's leadership position in industry affairs with the conferences he conducts on operating passenger trains on freight railroads and communications-based train control.