Monday, July 19, 2010

From the Editor: A look ahead to 2011—and a trip down memory lane (June 2010)

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From the Editor: A look ahead to 2011—and a trip down memory lane (June 2010) | Railway Age

By William C. Vantuono, Editor

More than a century ago, one of this magazine's chief editors remarked, “It may be true that experience is the best teacher. But a man is damned fool who cannot learn from anybody’s experience but his own.” This is perhaps the most important reason for a trade publication'“s existence, but it also applies to trade associations, and their annual expositions.

 After 18 years at Railway Age, I've attended dozens of industry trade shows. In recent years, two observations have caught my attention. One comes from suppliers, who expend a lot of time and money on these events: “The turnout is a bit disappointing. There should be more of our customers here.” The other comes from the railroads: “There are far too many trade shows. We’re too busy and have far too little staff to send people to every one.’

Points well taken. What’s the solution, Railway Supply Institute, Railway Systems Suppliers, Inc., Railway Engineering-Maintenance Suppliers Association, and American Railway Engineering and Maintenance-of-way Association?

Here’s your answer, railroads and suppliers: Railway Interchange 2011, Minneapolis, Sept. 18-21, 2011. Everybody-RSI, RSSI, REMSA, and AREMA-in one location, at the same time. All the railroad disciplines-mechanical, C&S, engineering-under one roof (Minneapolis Convention Center) and at one outdoor facility (Canadian Pacific’s Humboldt Yard). New technology. A wide variety of technical sessions. Best of all, the opportunity to see firsthand what your colleagues are doing.

Railway Interchange 2011 will be the biggest, most important railway industry exposition since the massive trade shows held "“back in the day” in Chicago. It has been close to a half-century since we had one of these events in the U.S. We strongly suggest you start planning for it, because September 2011 will be upon us sooner than you think.

railway-age-pullman-car-1883.jpgRailway Age’s own history is closely associated with such industry extravaganzas. In 1883, Chicago hosted the very first one, the month-long National Exposition of Railway Appliances, at the Inter-State Exposition Building, also known as the “Glass Palace” (where the Art Institute of Chicago now stands). The Exposition’s chief proponent and principal organizer was Railway Age President and Editor Elisha Hollingsworth Talbott, who joined forces with industry titans like George Westinghouse and George Pullman. The latter was responsible for building an opulent railroad car (pictured, below) for the Exposition.

John H. White, Jr. wrote about this car in the Winter 2010 edition of Chicago History magazine: “The most elegant form of railway travel was represented by a private car named Railway Age. In an interview with a New York Sun reporter, George Pullman explained that the car was one of the most luxurious ever placed on a pair of trucks. The car incorporated the best-of-the-best wheels, paneling, and lamps. It was painted Talbott Blue, a special blend of exterior paint mixed by Sherwin, Williams & Company and named in honor of the Exposition’s secretary and chief organizer. The observation room was paneled in oak, the floor covered in velvet carpets. The parlor was mahogany with inlaid panels and carvings from rare woods imported from all over the world. The bedroom was paneled in maple, the floor covered with amaranth (a purplish red) carpet. It would cost $75,000 to reproduce the car, and it was given to Talbott as a thank you by the exhibitors. Talbott and his wife took the car on a trip to Yellowstone and the Pacific Northwest. But the gift was too expensive for him to keep up, so within a few years, he sold it back to the Pullman Company, where it was used as a rental car.”

I wonder what happened to Railway Age’s first and only Pullman car. If you happen to know, drop me a line at wvantuono@sbpub.com.

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William Vantuono

With Railway Age since 1992, Bill Vantuono has broadened and deepened the magazine's coverage of the technological revolution that is so swiftly changing the industry. He has also strengthened Railway Age's leadership position in industry affairs with the conferences he conducts on operating passenger trains on freight railroads and communications-based train control.